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5 states shrinking unemployment

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  • 5 states shrinking unemployment

    January 12 2011

    Some states have been better than others at chipping away at their high unemployment rates. Here are five that have helped put their residents back to work.

    Most improved players ;

    Unfortunately for millions of unemployed Americans, the forecast for the job market doesn't look much brighter for 2011. For 20 straight months, unemployment has stood above 9% and Fed chairman Ben Bernanke said last week it could take "four or five more years for the job market to normalize."

    While the latest jobs report released last week showed that the unemployment rate fell slightly to 9.4% in December from 9.8% the previous month, the news conjured little cheer as the economy added fewer jobs than most economists expected. The drop occurred not because more workers found jobs but rather because fewer people continue to actively look for work.

    But it's worth looking at the bright side. Some states that saw unemployment peak well above the national average have seen joblessness drop at a faster pace than the rest of the country in the past year.

    Fortune takes a look at five of the most improved jobless rates during the past year and what makes them so extraordinary.

    Tennessee:
    Tennessee Unemployment rate : 9.4%
    Year over year drop: 1.3%

    During tough economic times, it seems there's no stopping the entrepreneurial spirit of Tennesseans. The nation's 17th largest state by population saw its unemployment rate fall substantially over the past year.

    While companies struggled to add jobs, many Tennesseans took it upon themselves to find work on their own -- either by starting their own businesses, picking up freelance work or offering their own services from lawn maintenance to home repair, says William Fox, economics professor at the University of Tennessee.

    "It doesn't appear that businesses were hiring much," Fox says, citing difference between the business survey and the separate household survey used to calculate the unemployment rate. The household survey showed that the labor force grew by 2.3% and employment rose by 3.8% over the past year, while the business survey showed only a 1% jump in employment.

    The difference suggests that while businesses aren't exactly hiring more, workers have nevertheless found work. Way to pull yourself up by your bootstraps, Tennessee.

    NEXT: Washington, DC

    Unemployment rate : 9.6%
    Year over year drop: 1.8%
    It's not exactly a state and its services-based economy is unlike many parts of the country, but the District of Columbia saw big declines in its unemployment rate this past year.

    Economists say the drop reflects a real decline in joblessness and not merely an influx of the long-term unemployed who have stopped looking for work. Indeed, our nation's capital fared better than the rest of the country during the recession and has recovered faster as well. Just prior to the recession in mid-2008, payrolls peaked at 710,000. By the end of 2009, they fell to 700,000 but have since recovered to close to 725,000 jobs.

    Sara Kline, an economist at Moody's Analytics, says the nation's capital naturally enjoyed a federal boost in spending. But the DC job market isn't altogether rosy. Recently there's been a jump in discouraged workers and those working part-time but want full-time employment.

    Overall, however, the numbers show a genuine rebound in the economy, Kline says. The economy has not only added government jobs but also private sector jobs -- mostly professional and business services tied closely to federal contracting.



    NEXT: Alabama

    Unemployment rate : 9%
    Year over year drop: 1.9%
    Alabama's auto industry took a major hit during the recession, with mass layoffs helping push the unemployment rate to a peak of more than 11% in early 2010. But the industry has seen a relatively modest rebound as the global economy slowly recovers, helping reduce the state's unemployment rate by 1.9% from November 2009.

    Production at the state's three major auto plants, Hyundai, Honda and Mercedes-Benz, has risen considerably. Sales for the entire Alabama-made Hyundai line were up 33% in December and 24% for the year. The Alabama-made Honda line saw a 25.5% increase. In August, Mercedes-Benz announced plans to hire more than 400 temporary employees at its Vance, Ala. auto factory.

    While a 9% unemployment rate is still high, it's nevertheless a marked improvement. Besides the auto industry, a rebound in the state's services industries, particularly leisure and hospitality, have helped bring joblessness down. Alabama added 4,800 jobs to these sectors over the previous year.

    Alabama is still a long way from its 2.7% unemployment rate from 2007. To get there, it will need to create more jobs outside of the auto industry.



    NEXT: New Hampshire

    Unemployment rate : 5.4%
    Year over year drop: 1.5%
    Not only does New Hampshire currently have one of the nation's lowest unemployment rates, but the state has seen some of the biggest reductions in joblessness this past year. Unemployment dropped by 1.5% to 5.4% in November from nearly 7% the same time last year.

    It may not be all that surprising that the New England state known to tourists as a winter playground for skiing and other recreation would fare better than the rest of the country. New Hampshire doesn't have a state income or sales tax, and the allure of its tax benefits has drawn new industries and companies. What's more, the state reinstated the New Hampshire Job Training Fund in 2007, partnering with companies to train more than 8,000 workers in new skills.

    In his inaugural address last week, New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch noted that, "The Federal Reserve Bank says New Hampshire had the fastest economic growth of any state in the nation in the past year, and predicts we will lead the country in economic growth in the coming year. The National Journal calls New Hampshire the highest-performing economy in the nation."

    Hats off to you, New Hampshire. Brace yourselves for an influx of unemployed out-of-staters.

    NEXT: Illinois

    Unemployment rate : 9.2%
    Year over year drop: 1.3%
    The nation's fifth most populous state does have a relatively high unemployment rate at 9.6%, but public infrastructure projects have helped reduce it from a much higher 11% a year earlier.

    In 2009, the state passed a $31 billion state bond measure to finance public works projects including improvements to O'Hare International Airport. According to a study by Southern Illinois University the spending will create 535,000 new full-time jobs over six years and more than $2.9 billion in state and local tax revenues.

    As for recovery of construction jobs in Illinois, much of this will depend upon continued government investments in infrastructure projects. Doug Whitley, CEO of the Illinois Chamber of Commerce, says he expects to see a continuation of these dollars flowing to state and local projects this year.

    An innovative bright spot in Illinois lies in their planned "green" projects such as the University of Illinois' proposal to build up to three 400-foot wind turbines.


    http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/...une/index.html
    8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

  • #2
    Hmmm - I might be thinking of moving to Illinois. My brother sure wants me to! It is definetely a thought.

    Comment


    • #3
      wow...now that's a thought...and even maybe a plan of action???? (but you need a break first...k?)
      8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

      Comment


      • #4
        Probably lower rates were indicative of the 99ers no longer being counted. My state realistically still has an unemployment rate of closer to 15%.

        On the flip side, Illinois just passed the largest tax increase in the state's history on Jan 12. Personal income taxes went from 3% to 5% and corporate taxes went form 4.8% to 7%. There may be a great exodus from that state!
        Filed July 2009. Discharged 08/08/2014. Awaiting closing. We made it !!!! Woo-hoo!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by andy158 View Post
          Probably lower rates were indicative of the 99ers no longer being counted. My state realistically still has an unemployment rate of closer to 15%.

          On the flip side, Illinois just passed the largest tax increase in the state's history on Jan 12. Personal income taxes went from 3% to 5% and corporate taxes went form 4.8% to 7%. There may be a great exodus from that state!

          i hear ya andy...but look at states like new jersey and calif...etc....their taxes are out of this world.....so i didn't do a comparative study...but i'm wondering what Illinois compares so other states that have state taxes????? i do know that we moved to florida because of the state tax structure...although, i think people that make millions have to pay some state tax here.
          8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by andy158 View Post
            Probably lower rates were indicative of the 99ers no longer being counted. My state realistically still has an unemployment rate of closer to 15%.
            The stats in original article apply to November 2010 State unemployment rates. That was before any changes in 99er UI claims went into effect. Also the State UE rates are only partially affected by UI claims, unlike the Federal UE numbers which do not use the State UI claims numbers at all.

            Instead of looking at states where unemployment is still very high, but decreasing, you might consider the five states with the lowest unemployment rates:

            1 NORTH DAKOTA 3.8%
            2 SOUTH DAKOTA 4.5%
            3 NEBRASKA.. 4.6%
            4 NEW HAMPSHIRE 5.4%
            5 VERMONT... 5.7%

            Of course most snowbirds and southerners aren't much interested in moving to North Dakota or Vermont.

            States with the highest unemployment (November 2010) are:

            47 RHODE ISLAND 11.6
            48 FLORIDA.... 12.0
            49 CALIFORNIA 12.4
            49 MICHIGAN.. 12.4
            51 NEVADA..... 14.3

            RI from loss of finance jobs, MI from auto and related, and FL, CA, and NV from fallout from the housing bubble and tourist industry. (oversimplifying a bit I know)

            None of the above numbers include the chronically long-term unemployed; we all know the real unemployment numbers are higher if everyone who wanted to work was included.

            (Dec 2010 State UE stats will be released on Jan 25, 2011.)

            http://www.bls.gov/web/laus/laumstrk.htm
            Last edited by WhatMoney; 01-17-2011, 08:40 PM.
            “When fascism comes to America, it’ll be wrapped in a flag and carrying a cross” — Sinclair Lewis

            Comment


            • #7
              Unemployment won't go down significantly without economic recovery, and economic recovery won't occur as long as elected officials don't even understand what it means.

              The single most important thing government has to do in order to bring about economic recovery is to shrink itself. Entirely too many dollars are taken from the people and wasted by government; and money taken away from the people is money that the people can't spend. But reducing taxes without reducing spending increases deficits and debt, which already threaten our nation's very economic solvency, as well as the Dollar's status as the world's reserve currency.

              In short, government needs to be cut -- deeply.

              Many people have their own ideas of what needs cutting, and most of these ideas have to do with obvious expenditures. Which ones people tend to favor is largely a function of their political beliefs. Conservatives look at "welfare" programs as total wastes of money and want to slash them. Liberals look at the military as a waste of money and want to cut it to the bone. But I have perhaps a more radical view.

              For example, I maintain that regulation is a major reason why the country's going broke, and that a large percentage of our laws need to be repealed if we ever want to become solvent again. Regulations ranging from those imposed on businesses to those codified into criminal law are costing us untold billions of dollars every year, and we simply can't afford them any more.

              Look at our criminal justice system, for example. As a result of decades of "get-tough" posturing by elected officials, we now incarcerate a higher percentage of our citizens than any nation in history. We incarcerate 751 people out of every 100,000 -- far and away the highest percentage of any society in the history of humanity. Let's compare that rate with a few other Western democracies:

              Prisoners per 100,000 People in a Country

              United States: 751
              England: 151
              Austria: 100
              Italy: 100
              Germany: 96
              Denmark: 72
              Switzerland: 72
              Norway: 64

              Politicians love talking tough when they enact laws calling for 10- or 20-year sentences for non-violent drug offenders (who are the majority of inmates in many, if not most prisons). But it costs money -- billions annually -- to implement these Draconian laws. The War on Drugs, like any war, has its costs -- and they are huge. But does anyone seriously believe that drug use is down because of these laws? As someone who volunteers with addicts and alcoholics, I know that's not the case at all. The only people who have benefited from the War on Drugs are those who work in the criminal justice system.

              Another example of a massive waste of money by the criminal justice system is sex offender registration. While initially a good idea, the system has grown more absurdly huge with each passing election as more and more offenders -- many of whose crimes were committed decades ago and who haven't bothered anyone since -- have been swept into it. In addition, the definition of "sex crimes" has gotten so absurd that we now have people having to register because they peed behind a dumpster.

              What, other than wasting money, is accomplished by dragging geriatric cases down to the police station four times a year, to provide information that the police already know, for the rest of their lives, because of crimes that were committed 20, 30, or more years ago? According to a comprehensive 2008 study by the U.S. Justice Department, Megan’s Law showed no demonstrable effect in reducing sexual re-offenses. Hundreds of millions of dollars could be saved by automatically releasing from registration requirements any offender whose crime occurred more than 20 years ago, or who has been out of prison for ten years without reoffending, whichever date is later.

              On the local level, New York City enacted a law banning smoking in bars a few years ago, and now sends undercover agents to bars to make sure that bartenders are enforcing the ban. That costs money. So do the inspectors who go around sampling fast foods to make sure the contain no trans-fats and making sure that the calorie counts posted on the menus are accurate.

              And then there's the friendly fire inspector who stops by my home office once a year to make sure my fire extinguishers have been inspected (which said inspection consists of my paying some guy that the Fire Department licensed to bang the fire extinguisher against his boot, look at the gauge, initial the paper tag, and charge me more than a new fire extinguisher would have cost). How much does a NYC Fire Inspector cost the taxpayers per year? With pension and benefits, I'd say close to 200 grand.

              In short, every time a law is enacted or a regulation promulgated, it costs money. Someone has to enforce that law. You may agree with the law's intent, or you may think it's stupid. But whatever the case, it still will cost money to enforce.

              -Rich
              Filed Chapter 7: 8/24/2010. Discharged: 12/01/2010
              Member and Exalted Grand Master: American Sarcasm Society (A.S.S.).

              Comment


              • #8
                I doubt it. The neighboring states around Illinois still have higher personal and corporate taxes. The tax increases are temporary once the economy recovers. Plus Illinois does not tax pensions.

                Originally posted by andy158 View Post
                Probably lower rates were indicative of the 99ers no longer being counted. My state realistically still has an unemployment rate of closer to 15%.

                On the flip side, Illinois just passed the largest tax increase in the state's history on Jan 12. Personal income taxes went from 3% to 5% and corporate taxes went form 4.8% to 7%. There may be a great exodus from that state!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Best and worst cities for jobs.....job update??????

                  Anthony Balderrama on Feb 23, 2011


                  Location matters when buying a home (“Oh, a lake view!”) or accepting a job offer (“It’s just a 15-minute drive!”). If you don’t like the home with the lake view, you can drive a few blocks and look for a home with a park view. Or you can turn down the job with the 15-minute drive and find one near a train stop. But if you’re job searching, your location isn’t quite as flexible. You can’t say, “The local economy is a bit rough, so I’ll just pick up and move across the country.” You can, I suppose, but it takes a lot of time and money, two items job seekers can’t afford to waste.

                  Recently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics looked at the unemployment situation in metropolitan areas throughout the country for December 2010, the month with the most current data. Although the economy’s recovery is slow and steady, it is improving when compared to year-over-year data.

                  Of the 372 metros included in the study, 238 held lower unemployment rates in December 2010 than they did in 2009. Conversely, 115 metro areas had higher unemployment rates, while only 19 were unchanged.

                  In December, the national unemployment rate was 9.1 percent. Yet, the rate in 109 metros was higher than 10 percent, a significant improvement from 140 metros in 2009. Fortunately, one number that did rise is the amount of metros with unemployment rates lower than the national average. In 2009, 66 metros had rates below 7 percent, but in 2010 that number climbed to 73 metros. It may seem like a small victory, but if you’re a job seeker in one of these states, it’s a welcome improvement.

                  Michigan boasts the most improvements

                  Michigan, a state that has seen some particularly rough jobless numbers over the past few years, experienced many of the best improvements from 2009 to 2010. According to the BLS, “The 10 largest year-over-year jobless rate decreases in December were reported in Michigan areas.” These cities all saw jobless decreases between 3.4 and 4.8 percent:
                  Muskegon-Norton Shores
                  Monroe
                  Jackson
                  Flint
                  Holland-Grand Haven
                  Detroit-Warren-Livonia
                  Saginaw-Saginaw Township North
                  Grand Rapids-Wyoming
                  Lansing-East Lansing
                  Niles-Benton Harbor

                  Unfortunately, Yuma, Ariz. experienced the largest year-over-year jobless rate increase at 4.4 percent. On the plus side, no other city saw a jobless rate increase higher than 2 percent, and even then only 24 metros experienced such jobless rises.

                  Who had the best years?

                  When it comes to who saw the biggest year-over-year increase in employment, each region of the country had some reason to boast. Two-hundred metros experienced improved employment, but these saw the most significant increases, ranging from 17,000 new workers to 57,500:
                  Washington, D.C.-Arlington-Alexandria
                  Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington
                  Boston-Cambridge-Quincy
                  Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale
                  Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington

                  In terms of percentage, these metros saw the biggest improvements:
                  Ocean City. (14.4 percent)
                  Kennewick-Pasco-Richland (4.9 percent)
                  Kokomo (4.5 percent)

                  Who had the worst year?

                  Unfortunately, not every city had a strong year. These metros saw the largest decreases in employment:
                  Chicago-Joliet-Naperville
                  San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont
                  Detroit-Warren-Livonia
                  Kansas City
                  Sacramento–Arden-Arcade—Roseville

                  Perhaps the most interesting point to be made about these cities is that Detroit saw a decrease in the number of workers, but in terms of the unemployment rate, it improved. Although there is no definitive way of knowing what is at play, long-term unemployed workers might have quit searching and no longer factor into the figure. Either way, the Detroit metro is an interesting area to watch.

                  And in terms of percentage, the cities with the largest December-to-December decreases were:
                  Bend, Ore. (3.8 percent)
                  Dalton, Ga. (3.5 percent)
                  Yuba City, Calif. (3.2 percent).

                  What you should do with this information

                  If you’re a job seeker, you might be wondering, “OK, so a lot of people are better off than they were a year ago, and some aren’t. So what?” Well, as a job seeker, you should always be aware of your local economy because it does affect your job search. Knowing what the employment situation is like where you live can help you understand why you’re not receiving an offer or inspire you to get more creative to stand out.

                  Another option that some job seekers will consider is relocation. We understand that it’s not for everyone. First, it’s expensive. Flying back and forth to interviewers, hiring movers or driving to your new city, and finding new place to live—they all cost money. Plus, leaving behind your family and friends isn’t always possible. However, if you have the means and desire to look beyond your current city, you will increase your chances of finding a job. In fact, some regions might be experiencing a shortage of workers in your industry, and you will be a sough-after applicant. You never really know what you’ll find by looking in another city.
                  8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What these statistics don't say is that Minneapolis-St Paul-Bloomington, really constitutes Bloomington and other suburb cities and the jobs are inaccessable by bus, which counts out a lot of people who either don't have a car or can't afford the gas (a lot of these jobs are 10-11 per hour) or, like me, have an older car that is not that reliable and if I don't have a bus option, I can't promise my car will hold up and I certainly can't buy another one on 11 per hour. So, the 'jobs' may be there but they are not at a liveable wage and often are inaccessable.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by discouraged View Post
                      What these statistics don't say is that Minneapolis-St Paul-Bloomington, really constitutes Bloomington and other suburb cities and the jobs are inaccessable by bus, which counts out a lot of people who either don't have a car or can't afford the gas (a lot of these jobs are 10-11 per hour) or, like me, have an older car that is not that reliable and if I don't have a bus option, I can't promise my car will hold up and I certainly can't buy another one on 11 per hour. So, the 'jobs' may be there but they are not at a liveable wage and often are inaccessable.
                      see....and so goes the "truth"...via the media i guess...
                      8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by discouraged View Post
                        So, the 'jobs' may be there but they are not at a liveable wage
                        Which holds true for most of the jobs that one gets offered nowadays...very, very sad...

                        Good luck to us all.
                        No person in their right mind files a Ch. 13 with lien strip pro se. I have.Therefore, please consider me insane and clinically certifiable when reading my posts, and DO NOT take them as legal advice of any kind.Thank you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had to say no thanks to one of those offered at 11.50 hour and no bus route available. Actually, if I could get to the thing, I'd probably take it just to have a job - but it was a phone interview anyway and I'm sure once we met and they saw the age (57), it wouldn't have been offered anymore. Maybe though - as that certainly isn't a realistic wage for metro living and only a desperate person would take it. I could probably pay rent on a dump and eat after transportation, taxes and whatever else they would take out, but that's about it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            really....how is anyone suppose to live on an 11.50 an hour job.....rent, gas, food, clothes..medical...please!!!!!

                            but then again, one most likely will be able to quaify for food stamps and medicaid oh! and that will really help this world be a better place...

                            to quote shark..."good luck to us ALL"...we need it now more than ever!
                            8/4/2008 MAKE SURE AND VISIT Tobee's Blogs! http://www.bkforum.com/blog.php?32727-tobee43 and all are welcome to bk forum's Florida State Questions and Answers on BK http://www.bkforum.com/group.php?groupid=9

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              At 11.50 an hour I would not qualify for food stamps, at least here, and probably not medicaid. I receive 377 a week from unemployment, which is 9.425 per hour. I am ineligible for food stamps (too much money) and pay $75 a month for MN Care (medicaid). At 11.50 I either would pay a higher premium or be cut off altogether, sad to say. Of course, I MAY get health insurance from the job, which would eat into that 11.50 tremendously.

                              Comment

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