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    Is the job market really that great now?

    I should say that since I had kept my 401K intact, and am currently living a lifestyle that is "college poverty plus", LOL, I am "early retired" (doing a "Roth ladder"), and have my health care needs taken care of from the ACA Medicaid expansion. I had given up on working in my field again (programming), but I keep hearing how great the job market is, but I wonder if it's really all that great. Methinks that employers are just whining because they can't quite get highly qualified folks that are desperate like they could a few years ago.

    #2
    I think it's still area-specific. Like you, I'm also in information systems, and after 30 years on the job, my skill sets are certainly of an older platform. Fortunately I've been with my company for 20 years and I'm skilled in the new stuff, but the hiring managers are very biased towards millenials who are graduating with the newest techologies. But on the other hand, I have a desperate need of C/Unix/SQL programmers and the colleges today don't really produce candidates with an understanding of the lower-level hardware and programming languages like assembly and C. And the job openings require relocation, further limiting the pool of available candidates.

    Have you thought any about relocation?

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      #3
      Originally posted by Vandervecken View Post
      I think it's still area-specific. Like you, I'm also in information systems, and after 30 years on the job, my skill sets are certainly of an older platform. Fortunately I've been with my company for 20 years and I'm skilled in the new stuff, but the hiring managers are very biased towards millenials who are graduating with the newest techologies. But on the other hand, I have a desperate need of C/Unix/SQL programmers and the colleges today don't really produce candidates with an understanding of the lower-level hardware and programming languages like assembly and C. And the job openings require relocation, further limiting the pool of available candidates.

      Have you thought any about relocation?
      I have thought about doing contract work, doing that on the road (and getting the the nice fat Per Diem breakout, or as 1099). I can handle the "access violation" errors that C throws off with no problem, but I don't have any paid experience with SQL, so no one wants to hire me. I wonder if employers who say they have a "desperate need" are really desperate.

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        #4
        Depends on your field. I think there's only a small sliver of "in demand" jobs that pay well. Even old-school "safe bets" like teaching are no longer guaranteeing employment and a living wage. Nurses where I work have been laid off left and right to make room for younger, cheaper, more desperate employees. The rest of the "booming" job market is low paid service work.

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          #5
          I think the job market in general, is a lot worse than it was a few years ago. 2017 I left a job, after a change in managers, for another. What a big mistak!e, the company it seems was "auditioning" people. No training was provided, I would be shown something for about 5 minutes, and sent to a light duty task. So many people were brought in, we were all bumping into each other, finally my job it seems, was taken by the daughter of my lead. She also had 3 of her 4 daughters working there. The company is still posting that same job on job boards, sometimes the wording varies slightly.

          Then, there is the employment agencies. It used to be they simply sent people out on job assignments. Now, most of the time it's just interviews. To make matters worse, my state considers these agencies to be your actual employer. Yeah, it's a job where they give you no hours or pay. It's definitely a mistake to sign with them, and it's horrible to weed through the junk on these so called legitimate boards, start to apply and you find out the so called job leads to another agency.

          I recently saw a meme on social media about what employers want, and it's so true. The list of qualifications will be something like, must have dependable transportation, willing to work weekends, we require a master's degree, the compensation is $10 per hour, no benefits and be on your feet for the shift. Oh, and I almost forgot, must be able to lift 80 pounds, repeatedly.

          I have been looking again since early February, and it's just so discouraging.

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            #6
            depends on your industry/career i guess

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              #7
              Long time lurker here, finally registered I'd have to agree with Vandervecken. Really area dependent. I think the 2016 election really surfaced what areas were hit harder than others in terms of economic mobility. Many say it was economic frustration that motivated trump to get elected, some argue it was more race based as a reaction to Obama's presidency. (Coates interview on this: https://goo.gl/prCc8F) Regardless the data that supports income inequality being at an all time high, is visible everywhere. Especially here in California, where on one side of the street you have huge homeless camps, and the other are billion dollar tech firms. Conversely, we're seeing a lot of new wealth created in the tech/silicon valley areas. I think it's been harder for lower income individuals to move up the class ladder despite the internet in being able to foster entrepreneurship. Cost of living continues to rise, debt accumulation, stagnant wages...etc. At least your healthcare is taken care of and you have a skillset that should be able to get you hired anywhere in this day an age. Compare that to a teacher starting out, I'd say you're doing pretty well!

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                #8
                I never believed in age discrimination until I turned 41 and found my well qualified self still unable to get a job.... Not using it as a crutch, I will find a good job, but the discrimination is all to real! I truly always thought it was BS.....

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                  #9
                  Unfortunately I agree with you @ch7downhill...the older you are the harder it is to find a good job. Age discrimination is very real, whether the company says they don't discriminate or not...
                  good luck with your job search.
                  Filed Chapter 13 - 07/20/12
                  Discharged 8/2/16

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by eddie559 View Post
                    Especially here in California, where on one side of the street you have huge homeless camps, and the other are billion dollar tech firms.
                    I've seen some reports of these homeless folks living on the street, doing bathroom activities on the street, etc. It looks like a scene out of India.

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