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2019 Income: Old/New Job Salary, Old Job Severance. Have Questions and Need Advice

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    #16
    I understand completely. Mine was slightly worse. The company never processed my wage deduction order and I thought they were paying, when they were not. Caused a few months of grief between me and the Trustee. They finally took notice when the plan change came (just before confirmation) as I initiatied a new wage deduction order to them
    Chapter 7 (No Asset/Non-Consumer) Filed (Pro Se) 7/08 (converted from Chapter 13 - 2/10)
    Status: (Auto) Discharged and Closed! 5/10
    Visit My BKForum Blog: justbroke's Blog


    I am not an attorney. Any advice provided is not legal advice.

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      #17
      Woah that's not good either.
      I may have to do that - update the HSA contributions, lower it by One Dollar annually. See if that gets it 'working'. This is just ridiculous. if the company has done this 195,000 times already (literally), then it should not be a problem to do it one. more. time. Seriously? Come on. Gah. I have a headache from rolling my eyes so much.

      I just don't want us to be wrongfully accused of 'waiting too long', or 'attempting to withhold money'. That's not the case. We just need to report accurate information, and unfortunately, we have to wait. I can't tell the attorney now: Oh, well, there's a glitch in the HSA contributions so let's hold off with notifying the trustee until the company can figure this out'. The attorney will most likely say, 'just send me what you have'. Um.... no. That's a really stupid idea. So, no. Anyway. I will just call and hassle the benefits department twice a day.

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        #18
        Well, the HSA issue is still ongoing. So, what I could do is, contribute to the HSA from our bank account until the issue is resolved. We don't get the tax benefit on those contributions, but at least we can put the money into the HSA, demonstrate the need, and have the documentation (evidence) that we are doing so, vs. trying to 'hide money' which is just stupid. I am thinking, the right course of action would be to contribute what should be deducted automatically - around about $140 per week. That was our plan.

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          #19
          Regarding the tax situation: I did run the scenario through TurboTax for 2019, saved the PDF files. I will also do the same for 2020, since I suspect the taxes will be higher for that year as well. That way, none of us have an incorrect notion that this tax issue is temporary, for 2019 only. If I run the 2020 scenario, then I can save the PDFs, and we will all be on the same page. Who knows; perhaps the 2020 taxes won't be higher. But we all need to know without a doubt.

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            #20
            Post-tax contributions to an HSA can be claimed when you file taxes next year. You'll receive the same tax benefit as if they were made pre-tax. Make sure to not contribute over the allowed maximum for 2019 (currently $7,000 for a family).

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              #21
              Thank you very much TomJ1!
              I suppose the trustee will have the same opinion regarding the HSA, whether I contribute manually or the company actually gets around to fixing their software.

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