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P.S.A. - OMG its so COLD in Colorado today!

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    P.S.A. - OMG its so COLD in Colorado today!

    That's all. It's so cold my nostrils froze shut. I'm done; no more outside.

    #2
    I am not going to mention that is was 83F here today. Nope, not going to do that to my friends Barbisi and Zombie13. I refuse to say anything about my location, and I refuse to accept anything cold.
    Chapter 7 (No Asset/Non-Consumer) Filed (Pro Se) 7/08 (converted from Chapter 13 - 2/10)
    Status: (Auto) Discharged and Closed! 5/10
    Visit My BKForum Blog: justbroke's Blog

    I am not an attorney. Any advice provided is not legal advice.

    Comment


      #3
      Well jb, I've got to confess that 83F is almost always too hot for me (esp. in Feb.) That's when I like it more like 50F!
      The trouble with Colorado (among lots of other things) is it's only 50ish for a few days at best before plunging back down to near zero - too much variety for my taste!

      Comment


        #4
        Barbisi don't forget the days when it's 70F and then it snows in the afternoon!
        Chapter 7 (No Asset/Non-Consumer) Filed (Pro Se) 7/08 (converted from Chapter 13 - 2/10)
        Status: (Auto) Discharged and Closed! 5/10
        Visit My BKForum Blog: justbroke's Blog

        I am not an attorney. Any advice provided is not legal advice.

        Comment


          #5
          Oh, that's right I forgot about the 50 degrees in a day drop,jb LOL!

          Comment


            #6
            This thread reminded me of the last time it got cold enough here in New England to result in a day-time high of below zero; are rare occurrence due to the moderating influences of the Atlantic Ocean.

            My wife teases me about being a Labrador Retriever because of my habit of going out to run or hike regardless of the weather. A few years ago on a very cold sub-zero day I went out for a run on my favorite snow mobile trail, a former 19th century railroad line; on the way out I was headed generally east by northeast with a quartering tailwind to my right rear. Needless to say, when I turned around about 40-minutes later the breeze, which was roughly 10-knots, was coming from my left front. No worries, I was well and truly warmed up and I was dressed with a polypropylene inner layer from neck to ankle along with an insulated outer shell with a fancy shiny filament liner (kind of reminds me of an old "space blanket"); additionally I had a heavy long-sleeved cotton tee-shirt between the polypro inner layer and the insulated outer layer.

            When I got back home I tried to remove my pull-over outer shell, I was able to get my right arm out with no issues, not so the left. It turns out that quartering cold wind had frozen the sleeve protecting my left arm into an effective solid tube of ice and fabric which was so rigid I couldn't fit my hand through the tube. I ended up needing to get into the shower and run hot water on the fabric for at least five minutes before I was able to peel it off. At this point I need to reiterate, at no time was I even remotely cold; I'm thinking the ice acted as an insulator and windshield for my left arm.
            Latent car nut.

            Comment


              #7
              shipo, I remember the first time my jacket "froze" up there in New England. I didn't even know what to think of it. My thoughts were that cloth freezing was impossible. Well, maybe it didn't freeze, but the fabric went stiff and maneuvering was difficult. I don't know if the jacket was neoprene, polyester, or some other synthetic, but it definitely changed from a soft pliable fabric into a crunchy stiff covering akin to cardboard.

              My worst day ever was Kansas City, Missouri. I went outside when it was -23F with a windchill of -65F. I only walked two blocks but people insisted that I was absolutely crazy. They were right. I was absolutely frozen in just 5 minutes.
              Chapter 7 (No Asset/Non-Consumer) Filed (Pro Se) 7/08 (converted from Chapter 13 - 2/10)
              Status: (Auto) Discharged and Closed! 5/10
              Visit My BKForum Blog: justbroke's Blog

              I am not an attorney. Any advice provided is not legal advice.

              Comment


                #8
                LOL, yeah, I'm thinking not only did the fabric itself freeze, but there was a LOT of moisture as well; trust me, after a ten-mile run, there was a significant amount sweat which had been wicked away from my skin by the polypro layer and pushed into the cotton and outer layers. In the end, the frozen sleeve tube was a combination of fabric and frozen moisture from my body.
                Latent car nut.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by justbroke View Post
                  I am not going to mention that is was 83F here today. Nope, not going to do that to my friends Barbisi and Zombie13. I refuse to say anything about my location, and I refuse to accept anything cold.
                  Yeah yeah yeah.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by shipo View Post
                    LOL, yeah, I'm thinking not only did the fabric itself freeze, but there was a LOT of moisture as well; trust me, after a ten-mile run, there was a significant amount sweat which had been wicked away from my skin by the polypro layer and pushed into the cotton and outer layers. In the end, the frozen sleeve tube was a combination of fabric and frozen moisture from my body.
                    Could you still move?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Zombie13 View Post

                      Could you still move?
                      Yeah, my wrist, elbow, and shoulder were still flexible as they were constantly being moved during the run.
                      Latent car nut.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I know someone who thought it would be good to video an experiment in Minnesota by putting their hand outside in subzero weather to see how long they could do it. They darn near got frostbite. Actually in the video they describe what they felt and it literally was the beginning of frostbite. Stick to the experiments like tossing water and it freezes. People do dumb things.

                        Comment


                        • Zombie13
                          Zombie13 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Yeah not wise to risk frostbite!

                        #13
                        Unfortunately for me, I had never experienced sub-zero temperatures like that, so I didn't know that you don't go outside when it's -23F with a windchill of -65F. I definitely learned my lesson that day. I took a taxi on the way back even though it was 2 blocks and gave the driver a $20 tip.
                        Chapter 7 (No Asset/Non-Consumer) Filed (Pro Se) 7/08 (converted from Chapter 13 - 2/10)
                        Status: (Auto) Discharged and Closed! 5/10
                        Visit My BKForum Blog: justbroke's Blog

                        I am not an attorney. Any advice provided is not legal advice.

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Interesting; I grew up in Michigan and delivered news papers for five years, we had a two week stretch during the winter of 1970-1971 where the warmest it got was -22°F; during that period I got into a fight on the school bus on the way home one day and lost my hat. We didn't have the money to replace it, so I went without. During the first week I remember needing to stop at every house, even the ones where I wasn't delivering a paper, and cover my ears with my hands because they were in so much pain. By the second week my ears had grown used to it and to this day, I don't need any coverings on my ears, regardless of how cold it gets, including the time in 1980 when I was skiing at Jackson Hole when the OAT was -56°F (before wind chill).

                          I heard a theory once which went something like this, "The more exposure to near frost bite your skin endures, the more the blood will temporarily freeze inside the blood vessels, and the more that happens, the more blood they can carry (I assume because, like water, blood expands when frozen)." I have never been able to confirm that theory, but it does seem to hold true, I remember many days as a kid on the farm in the 1960s where my hands and feet were so painfully frozen cold water felt boiling hot when I came inside. Once again, even running on sub-zero days, my only hand covering is a light weight pair of knit cotton gloves.
                          Latent car nut.

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